A Home To Two Artists!

These are from V, residing in Chennai, a self-taught first-timer, having a go at Warli – a tribal art from Maharashtra – with left-over paints!

The art form, simple in its elements and color, acquires in composition an undeniable charm of its own evident in these panels.

Unfortunately, not offered for sale, not available for even public viewing – for they are painted on a wall at the back of their house!

The second artist remains unnamed, unacclaimed, prolific, the wide world his/her canvas cum gallery. Titled ‘Exuberance’ this is his/her handiwork – perhaps the palette board – in a patch tended by V herself in their front yard:

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At Chennai International Airport

As we deplaned at the international airport at Chennai – it was a domestic flight from Mumbai – and made our way to collect our baggage, on both sides of the long walk we were treated to some delightfully eye-catching high-quality art-works – panels in relief, paintings, icons carved in wood…all drawing upon the rich cultural motifs of Tamil Nadu.

And that’s when our good old Murphy’s Law kicked in. Even if the gentleman had not said anything on the subject, I’m sure you’ll know what I mean. Here was art decked out in all its splendor pining for attention and adulation, and for crying out loud, my camera-cum-cell-phone rides in my wife’s handbag, about fifty feet in the lead. Lumbering along with a particularly heavy piece of cabin baggage, I had to be content merely ogling at these art pieces, telling myself may be next time…

Finally, caught up with the lady waiting for me to join at the entrance to the baggage hall.

I set my load on the floor and told her by gestures there was a pressing matter to attend that cannot keep..

Inside the toilet, I finished the business and then by sheer chance looked up.

And saw this:

The poster art, a civic initiative, by itself made sense as the city is presently reeling under severe water shortage this year. But its juxtaposition

May be it’s a brilliant move: Where/How else a message could get undivided attention for even up to a minute or more smack in the face of an audience helplessly glued to their station and at the same time in a relieved frame of mind 🙂

Retrieved my camera and took a shot of the art to ponder over the ways of those creative minds that worked on it – a perfect brain-food 🙂

And a small compensation for not ‘capturing’ those enchanting art pieces?

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Intense Impressionism

A Wonderful Night
Dreamy Paradise Point
Notre-Dame At Dusk
Rainy Autumn Afternoon
A Corner Of Florence
Impressions Of Hawaii
Merry Christmas

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It isn’t WYSIWYG – What You See Is What You Get…

It’s WYGIWYDS What You Get Is What You Don’t See!

Rather it’s what the Russian artist Gleb Goloubetski sees! And how!

Here we go:

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Even Cityscapes Could Be Beautiful

Larung Gar in Tibet

Source: CockTale \ Prakash Vora

Venice, Italy (a painting?)

Source: Tirutoraipoondi

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Pleasing Asymmetry

Kolam is an ubiquitous art form widely practiced in the south of drawing patterns of dots, lines and curves laid just outside the main door of the house, every morning, welcoming ‘gods’ and visitors to the house. Unlike the welcome-mat, the kolam is never stepped on. Usually simple, on festive occasions, it gets more flamboyant and even embellished with flowers.

Every morning the area is first cleaned by splashing water out of a bucket by the maid or the housewife marking the start of the day for the entire household. An energizing sound, not annoying in the least unlike the strident alarm clocks, announcing the arrival of a new dawn and all is well with the world. A sound that I wake up to even today when we visit my sister-in-law’s place in Chennai, to the accompaniment of an orchestra of bird-calls – it meant Thaayamma, an illiterate old lady and a ceaseless wonder, at work pulling off in a breeze a non-repeat elegant design on the wet floor with no shake or break in her kolam.

The white flour – no artificial colors – used to make the kolam up is intended to be food for ants, insects, etc. – unfortunately these days in many places powder from pulverized pebbles, by no means edible, is used for reasons not known to me yet. Infrequently, flour paste is used if the kolam is needed to last longer and not easily blown away.

The ‘canvas’ on the floor also lets the womenfolk to show off their artistry and creativity, with houses trying to outdo each other during festivals. The women learn it largely from their families when young though books are available these days.

In general, it may not be too wrong to say the kolam on the outside often reflects in some ways the state of well-being on the inside.

Kolam‘s are also drawn inside the house in the pooja room where gods are worshiped.

My wife’s doing today, more as a ‘welcome’ gesture than food for non-existing insects, a simple traditional flour kolam, with two leaves instead of the usual four, generating a pleasing asymmetry:

 

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PS: In the north the art takes the form of Rangoli that is far more elaborate and filled with colors especially during festivals.

Beautiful Japan

Found these ‘urban’ pictures  of Japan as beautiful – what, ‘urban’ and beauty? yes, it is – as those of cherry blossoms (see the source below):

JAPAN

Late Night SceneNeonfantaji (Neon Fantasy)After the Rain20 YearsFuturismYoasobiMidnight NoirNight StrollStore Front

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Source: Sent by Deepak Punjabi along with a video from Gabriel Traveler on     funonthenet.