Can You Spot It?

Something interesting here, I thought, though not the kind to set Ganges on fire.

This is a picture taken by B, an ex-colleague. a friend, a nature lover, an ace shooter…with his camera, a cook who loves to experiment, a reviewer of eateries, etc. etc.

Location: Chembur.

To me, it is interesting to see this winged fellow picking twigs for the nest, all of uniform girth, neither too thick and stiff or too thin and breakable as if there exists some engineering specification!

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Now, For Some Forgotten Melodies!

Songs we missed our classes to hear on radio! Not likely to be heard in these days.

A coincidence that I noticed later – all the songs are Shankar Jaikishen’s!

Good quality clips of these songs are difficult to obtain.

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‘Tum Jo Humare Meet Na Hote Geet Ye Mere Geet Na Hote’ from Aashiq (1962) sung by Mukesh. Stars Raj Kapoor, Nanda, Padmini, Keshto Mukherjee and Leela Chitnis. Music: Shankar Jaikishen. Lyrics: Shailendra and Hasrat Jaipuri. Director: Hrishikesh Mukerjee.

Video here.

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‘Suno Ji Suno Hamari Bhi Suno’ in Ek Dil Sau Afsane (1963) sung by Mukesh. Stars: Raj Kapoor. Waheeda Rehman, Lalita Pawar, Sulochana Chatterjee, Mridula Rani, Mehar Banu and Jagdish Raj. Music: Shankar Jakishan. Lyrics: Shailendra.

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‘Bahar Banke Woh Muskuraye’ from Apne Huye Paraye (1964) sung by Lata Mangeshkar. Actors: Manoj Kumar, Mala Sinha, Shashikala, Lalita Pawar, Agha, Padma Kumari, Sunder, Chand Burke, Dulari, Iftekhar, Ramayan Tiwari, Savitri and Naina. Music: Shankar Jaikishan. Lyrics: Hasrat Jaipuri. Director: Ajit Chakraborty. Producer: Ajit Chakraborty.

Video here.

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‘Begaani Shaadi Mein’ from Jis Desh Mein Behti Hai (1960) sung by Lata Mangeshkar and Mukesh. Actors: Padmini, Raj Kapoor, Pran, Lalita Pawar, Raj Mehra and Sulochana Chatterjee. Music: Shankar Jaikishan. Lyrics: Shailendra and Hasrat Jaipuri. Director: Radhu Karmarkar.

Video here.

**

End

Unforgettable Melodies

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‘Chal Mere Dil’ in Ishara (1964) sung by Mukesh. Stars: Joy Mukherjee, Vaijayanti Mala, Pran and Pratima Devi. Music: Kalyanji Anandji. Lyrics: Armaan Malik.

Video here.

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‘Kisi Ki Muskurahaton Pe Ho Nisar’ in Anari (1959) sung by Mukesh. Stars: Raj Kapoor, Nutan, Nazir Hussain, Lalita Pawar, Motilal, Shubha Khote, Mukri and Helen. Music: Shankar Jaikishen. Lyrics: Shailendra.

Video here.

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‘Yeh Raat Bheegi Bheegi’ in Chori Chori (1956) sung by Manna Dey and Lata Mangeshkar. Stars:  Nargis, Raj Kapoor, Gope, Pran, Bhagwan, Johnny Walker, David and Raj Mehra. Music: Shankar Jaikishen. Lyrics: Shailendra.

Video here.

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 ‘Raat ne kya kya khwaab’ in Ek Gaon Ki Kahani (1957) sung by Talat Mahmood. Stars: Mala Sinha, Talat Mahmood, Abhi Bhattacharya, I. S. Johar, Nirupa Roy, Lalita Pawar, Bipin Gupta and Dulari. Music:  Salil Chaudhary. Lyrics: Shailendra.

Video here.

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End

Unforgettable Melodies

Hai Apna Dil To Awara Na Jane Kis Pe Aye Ga‘ in Solva Saal (1958), sung by Hemant Kumar. Music: SD Burman. Lyrics: Majrooh Sultanpuri. Starring : Dev Anand, Waheeda Rehman, Jagdev, Sunder, Bipin Gupta and Tun Tun. Producer: Chandrakant C Desai. Director: Raj Khosla.

Watch it here if it doesn’t show up.

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Jaa Re Ud Jaa Re Panchi‘ in Maya (1961) sung by Lata Mangeshkar. Stars: Mala Sinha, Dev Anand, Lalita Pawar and Amjad Khan. Director: D.D Kashyap. Music: Salil Choudhury. Lyrics: Majrooh Sultanpuri.

Watch it here if the clip doesn’t show up.

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Finally of more recent vintage:

‘Aane Wala Pal Jane Wala Hai’ in Golmaal (1978) sung by Kishore Kumar. Stars: Bindya Goswami, Amol Palekar, Utpal Dutt, Deven Varma, Shubha Khote, David, Deena Pathak, Manju Singh, Om Prakash and Keshto Mukherjee. Music: R.D. Burman. Lyrics: Gulzar. Director: Hrishikesh Mukherjee.

If the clip doesn’t show up watch it here.

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More music here: [Keshavlal, The Amazing Street Singer From Gujarat] [Thank God, We’re All So Different!] [Unforgettable Melodies] [Sure To Get You On Your Feet…] [Unforgettable Melodies] [Will You Watch A Girl Dance – No Bump, Grind, Pout, Skin] [Unforgettable Melodies] [Unforgettable Melodies (more)] [Dare You Try Getting Them Out Of Your Head – Unforgettable Melodies] [Unforgettable Melodies] [Some Amazing Ghazals!] [The Magic Of Music] [The Magic Of Music] [The Magic Of Music] [Forgettable Music??]

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Intense Impressionism

A Wonderful Night
Dreamy Paradise Point
Notre-Dame At Dusk
Rainy Autumn Afternoon
A Corner Of Florence
Impressions Of Hawaii
Merry Christmas

End

Some Amazing Ghazals!

Couldn’t figure out who these amazing kids are.

But before that, here’s a quick chat-pat ‘Wedding Bells’ by Rajesh Vaidhya, originally composed by the maestro Chitti Babu. If it doesn’t appear here you’ll find it here.

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Now for the kids:

A melodious song Dil de diya hai from the movie Masti cover by Rahul Jain with some nice Hindi lyrics. If the clip doesn’t appear, go here:

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Tumhe Dil lagi Bhool… a ghazal song written by lyricist Purnam Allahabadi and composed by prominent Sufi singer of Pakistan Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan. You’ll also find it here:

Update from here:

…It was almost a year ago that 18-year-old Maithili Thakur, along with her younger brothers Rishav (15) and Ayachi (12), decided to archive the songs they’d heard from their grandmothers on both sides, and their father, a music teacher. Some of these songs were learned in Dharbanga and Uren, both in Bihar. “We wanted people to listen to the beautiful world of Bhojpuri folk, that’s melodious and has wonderful lyrics…” With no special recording equipment, microphones, auto tuners or studio, the three Thakur children sit on their bed in Dwarka, Delhi, with a high-pitched baaja and tabla and sing with gusto… ”

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Romance On Rails (Updated)

A Vignette

Thirupparaithurai, our village, flanked by an endless roll of lush rice fields on one side and by the river Cauvery on the other, is some miles (<10) from the town of Trichinopoly (Trichy) – a place we spent some part of our annual school vacation (the rest in nearby Srirangam).

At the back of the sprawling house, some 100 meters away, ran a single train track, straight as far as we could see, to/from Trichy from/to Kulithalai/Erode (for some reason the track is not doubled even today and the station, sadly, stands decommissioned, overrun by weeds and vines, for want of traffic).

The track served a few long-distance trains and a couple of local trains for office-goers from villages around.  Standing out among them, even today, is the Pilot that fetches the commuters to Trichy in the morning and returns in the evening.

In those days it was widely rumored how the powerful bus operators were pressing on the railways to schedule the Pilot in a way it did not draw the crowd away from them during the busy hours! It may not be out of place here to mention the state has excellent network of bus services – you could go from anywhere to anywhere any time of the day (of course, some restrictions apply!).

It was for us an eagerly awaited daily experience to hear the whistle of the Pilot in the distance. We ran through the back-door of the house , past the long and full cow-shed, huge hay-stacks, the water-well and the toilet – yes, in those days toilets were located far back outside the house – to reach the back-door of the property. Beyond, the ground dipped into a grassy ‘valley’ to rise on the other side bearing the track, all within about 15 feet.

Standing at a safe distance from the track, we kept our eyes peeled and hands free and ready. First it was the dadak-dadak rumble of the wheels on the rails, soon followed by the puff-puff smoke-belching steam loco, slowing down as it neared a road-crossing and then immediately the station. As the loco passed us, we would frantically wave and shout to the driver to get his attention; he always stood on the side and leaning out to look ahead for safe passage – there were always people footing it across the tracks in a hurry even when the gate at the crossing was down barring road traffic and the train was almost there.  

For a few seconds, he would take his eyes off and look at us, return our greeting with a wave of his hand, his coal-blackened face breaking into a smile – enough to get us thrilled high!

We wouldn’t move until the train, after a halt of a minute or so, whistled and slowly pulled out of the station. A sad moment it was for us as it slowly receded from our sight and we trotted back to the house wordless.

Of course it was all forgotten soon as other distractions kicked in…until the next morning.

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For some reason, a railway train, particularly its steam, diesel or electric loco has been and is even now a sight that fascinates many, evoking awe at the machine and its brute power and speed. An enduring romance.

The Mumbai artist Biswas captures it on his canvas like it is!

From his profile:

Kishore Pratim Biswas lived near a locomotive workshop in Kolkata when he was a child. It was very easy for one to spot steam locomotives every now and then, and as an enthusiastic 5-year-old kid, he loved to run out and watch them go. He would then come back home and sketch what he saw. A giant locomotive surrounded by steam – the aura of that scene attracted him tremendously, and inspires him even today. The firemen and drivers at the workshop became his friends, and they would usually gather around to look at his sketches. He remembers listening to their stories and trying to sketch all their emotions on a piece of paper…

He graduated in Fine Arts from Government College of Art & Craft, Kolkata, spent a few years in his hometown, and then moved to Mumbai in 2009.

Here we go:

Update

After Kannan’s idyllic description of the scene near IIT, Guwahati (see in Comments), I had requested him for a few snaps. He kindly obliged with the following:

Here’s the strange thing with Agthori, perhaps unique in the vast railways network: the lone platform – seen in the pic – is some 300 mts away from the main station and its entrance! It seems the Station Master’s office and the entrance would be moved nearer to the platform once the land needed nearby is acquired.

Also if the train were to stop in front the present Station Master’s office, it would be required to go back a good 200 mts at least before moving forward and picking up enough speed to go over the slope ahead.


A view of the Station Master’s office at the entrance 


A view of Agthori railway station from the road over the bridge near IIT entrance gate.
A view of IIT staff living quarters

The locals n and around prefer to commute the distance of 20 kms to the city by road and, yes, a ferry across the mighty Brahmaputra!

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Source: thebetterindia.com/42929/locomotives-paintings-by-kishore-biswas/