Thank God, We’re All So Different!

Today, came across a delightful clip that brought back these thoughts:

StatesWe’re 29 states and 7 union territories at the last count. 

Every 50 square kilometers with its own art, culture, cuisine….Challenges aside, so much to enjoy, celebrate…What would be our lives without our friends in Kerala, Maharashtra, Rajasthan, Bengal, Assam…all pitching in, unique in their own ways.

Now for the clip, originally from Malayalam: Sung by amazingly mellifluous G Sreeram and Vaikkom Vijayalakshmi (visually impaired from birth), the eminently hummable melody composed by M Jayachandran. and the beautiful lyrics by Rafeeq Ahmed going one-up on the music – the chaste Tamizh translation so balmy on the ears, voices climbing up and down the scales so effortlessly, a little fast-paced but pleasingly so, the lilt continuing to ring in one’s ears long after it’s played out – enjoy

 

Aren’t we lucky?

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PS: The song is from ‘Celluloid’. a 2013 Malayalam film written and directed by Kamal, starring Prithviraj and Mamta Mohandas in the lead roles. The film is a biopic based on the life story of J.C. Daniel, the pioneer of Malayalam cinema.

Here’s the original in Malayalam from the same singers:

 

Source: image from incredibleindiatour.net/states/

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When The Heart Is In The Right Place…

A short clip capturing a sight one doesn’t get everyday to see – a thoughtful act of kindness from our much-maligned constabulary.:

 

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Source: vide Vaijayanthi Raghavan in FB.

Musings Of An Idle Philosopher

Bad

 

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Source: THELATESTQUOTE

 

“What, Age? Duh”

IMG-20180616-WA0002

 

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Source: Gopalaswamy

Accounting Karma (A Story For Children)

Watch out…you may be hit with it even if you had nothing to do with the act if you’re not careful. .

An old story brought back in WhatsApp:

Sagarworld com

It was a Friday. As customary, the King was out on the palace grounds under a shamiana performing anna dhaanam, distributing with his own hands food to the poor and the needy.

Presently at the head of the food line was an old man bent with age, hunger writ on his face.

Just then an eagle flew overhead holding its meal by its claws – a serpent. In a desperate struggle to free itself from a certain death the serpent spit out its poison. No one noticed a drop of it falling down through a netted air-vent in the shamiana’s canopy into the large anda of rice porridge being served out.

The old man received a generous helping of the porridge with a kind word spoken by the King.

No sooner he stepped out, overcome by hunger, he partook some of the porridge, his unsteady hands spilling much of it on the ground. Even before the little went down from the mouth to his stomach, the old man was stricken with convulsions and he dropped dead right there for all to see.

Elsewhere in the Heavens…

The venerable Chitragupta, the eternal book-keeper was vexed. The eagle was simply returning home after the hunt, holding the prey with its claws, to feed its young.  It had not anything violating its dharma. The serpent was only trying all it could to escape a certain death. The king had no knowledge of what had happened as he went about doing his good deed. Under the circumstances, to whom should he debit the karma of causing the death of the hapless old man?

Unable to resolve it satisfactorily, Chitragupta took the matter to his master, Lord Yama, the god of all dharma and death. Yama heard him out and advised him to wait for some more time; surely, he would get his answers.

In the afternoon a small group of Brahmins, returning from a pilgrimage to Kashi, came into the city.  Informed of the King’s anna dhanam, they reached the shamiana, only to find it completely deserted with no living soul anywhere in sight. Unaware of the morning’s happening, they suspected, given the prosperity evident all around, perhaps the King ran out of people to give and hence had gone back to his quarters.  While speculating on their next move, one of them suggested they should still try to meet the King in person. He would not send them back hungry. Also they could present him with a few of the gangai-chombu’s (small copper vessels filled with water from the Ganges and sealed at the mouth) they carried with themselves for people back home who were not fortunate to make the trip. The King was sure to like receiving them, a rarity in his land.

They located a fruit vendor at a distance and asked her directions for the King’s quarters. She obliged them pointing out the way. They thanked her and set themselves about when she called one of them and said in hushed voice:

’You all appear to be innocent out-of-town folks. Sad it would be to see you landing in trouble. And, don’t ever tell anyone I cautioned you. If you must and when you do meet him – I’ve no idea why you wanted to – don’t ever touch the food the King may offer you. Think of some ruse to say no. If he doesn’t like someone’s face, without a twinge of conscience he would poison his food. And who is to say he would like your faces? Just this morning I saw with my own eyes…’

At that instant Chitragupta in the Heavens was greatly relieved. Just as his master had said, now he knew whom to debit…

 

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Source: Image from sagarworld.com

 

 

Who Is She?

The One Wish…