Carriers (101 Words)

They filed down Main Street, stone-faced, pitiful, dragging their loads resolutely behind them.

“Who are they?” I asked someone.

“Carriers,” he said. “Odd bunch. Anything that hurt them goes in those packs.”

“Anything?”

“Look for yourself.”

Their packs overflowed with knives and glass shards, snakes, and cigarette packs.

Pins.

Needles.

Books stacked several rows deep.

A whole stove top.

Guns beyond counting.

“They carry all that weight their entire lives. Weird, right?”

I thought of the photo inside my wallet: her smile and wisps of loose hair around her temples.

“No,” I replied, slowly. “I don’t think it’s weird at all.”

End

Source: Matt Spaetzel in 101words.org

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Subashitha

Sanmargam

(Pithy sayings in Sanskrit)

सज्जनस्यहृदयं नवनीतं यद्वदन्ति कवयस्तदलीकम् ।

अन्यदेहविलसत्परितापात्सज्जनो द्रवति, नो नवनीतम् ॥

Poets say that the heart of a good man is like butter, but that is not correct.

The heat (frustration/sorrow/ etc.) residing in another body does not melt butter,

but it does melt the good man.

End

Source: sanskritdocuments.org/doc_z_misc_subhaashita/subhaashhita_kedar.html?lang=sa and image from hsph.harvard.edu/magazine/magazine_article/is-butter-really-back/

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An Old Story And New Insights

A story most from my generation must have heard as children sitting on the lap of their grandma (don’t know what is said to them these days). It goes generally like this:

In a village an old woman sitting under a tree prepared vada’s for sale.

A crow sitting on the tree waited for an opportunity.

When the woman was looking away, the crow swooped down and flew up and away, picking up a delicious vada in its beaks, all in a flash.

As it sat on a branch of a nearby tree, ready to savour its booty, a fox came along. .

Espying the crow atop with the vada in its beaks,the scheming fox spoke:

‘Oh my friend there, news got to me you’re blessed with a very sweet voice that has the koels go away in shame! I have come from a long distance only to hear your voice. Could you kindly sing a song for me? Won’t you? Please don’t disappoint me. ’

The crow was thrilled to hear these words. Not to disappoint its appreciative audience, the crow obliged.

As it opened its mouth going ‘kaa kaa’, the inevitable happened.

The fox grabbed the fallen vada with alacrity and quietly slipped away leaving the crow in a daze.

Usually the grandma, a simple soul, finished the story and made her demand like the child should now go to sleep or eat its food without further fuss…The moral of the story was not explicitly stated. And we simply understood it as: the crow was foolish and the fox wily.

Grandma’s, in the generations that followed, grew more articulate. They would point out how it was unwise of crow to foolishly embark on what it was not capable of, falling a victim to flattery.

Some crow lovers, not happy with the story, added a second round where the crow, learning from its experience, would hold the vadaunder its claws and belt it out raucously to the fox’s dismay.

A few die-hard purists steered the story back to its original course: In a third round, the fox would request the crow holding the vada in its claws to perform a dance. Yes, it meant the foolish crow…

In some versions, the smart crow, till the end, holds fast to the vada while obliging the fox with song and dance.

In all these versions the story is one of getting into deep waters and followed optionally by learning from one’s experience and getting out unscathed.

The one moral of the story, right before us in plain sight, yet strangely missed by most, was pointed out by Dr Sudha Seshayyan in one of her programs I watched today:

Ill-gotten gains are never enjoyed.

At one stroke this invalidates the versions that let the crow get away with the vada.  All said and done the crow was a thief stealing it from the old woman. Unintended consequences of tampering an old tale?

End

Source: image from YouTube

Mirror, Mirror, On The Wall, Who’s The Cruelest Of Them All?

Source: gopalswamy

See here: Time Will Tell

End

Karma Is Not A Bitch, It’s More Like A…

Sanmargam

From Naaladiyar inOld Tamil Poetry:

பல் ஆவுள் உய்த்துவிடினும், குழக் கன்று
வல்லது ஆம், தாய் நாடிக் கோடலை; தொல்லைப்
பழவினையும் அன்ன தகைத்தே, தற் செய்த
கிழவனை நாடிக் கொளற்கு.

One cannot escape the consequences of his action. Wherever he hides, his bad karma will catch up with him. Like a calf that is let loose among a herd of cows. Though there is a herd of many cows, the calf will zero in on its mother easily. Likewise bad karma will find and attach itself to the man responsible for it.

TheNāladiyār(Tamil:நாலடியார்) is aTamilpoetic work ofdidacticnature, next only to Thirukkural, composed by Jain monks, belonging to thePatiṉeṇkīḻkaṇakkuanthology ofTamil literature. This belongs to the postSangamperiod corresponding to between 100 – 500 CE.Nāladiyārcontains 400 poems, each containing four lines. Every poem deals with morals and ethics, extolling righteous…

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Musings Of An Idle Philosopher

Lion

 

End

 

 

 

Source: Pinterest; Photo: ‘Cool Cat’ by Isak Pretorius, South Africa. Highly commended in the ‘Animal Portraits’ of ‘Wildlife Photographer Of The Year 2018’ contest.

Life Is Not Short…

Sanmargam

gulzar

Only we begin to live late in the day.

End

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