The Best From Philly

(Not another travelogue or extracts from city tour-guides – pls read till the end)

It was an enjoyable 2-day trip to the historic city of Philadelphia.

On the way back, between songs played from a phone, Ne (8 years old) threw a question: What was it one liked the best among the various sites visited during the trip?

She kicked off with The US Mint – that’s what I liked the most.” Though on a Sunday the machines were switched off and no shining piles of coins to be seen.

Phil punching press

(Pic: This diminutive press packs the wallop of an elephant herd!)

Her jaws dropped reading the titbit on the enormous pressure required to punch  blanks out of sheet-rolls. For instance, to stamp a penny blank, weight of 16 elephants or the force of 3 speeding trains are required!!

Others too came up with (edited for readability):

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The sight of the huge suspension bridge over the Delaware river, luxury apartments on the waterfront, the leisurely walk on the crowds-free pier sticking out into the river, gazing at the waters… Adding spice to the scene was a just-married joyous couple made to pose like this, like that, by a photographer throwing himself in unusual postures like going down on all fours, stepping up on a tree-trunk… Also, the Liberty Bell with its rich history.

Phila

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Walking through a huge model of a human heart…brought back memories of the days 25+ years ago when we dissected a goat’s heart in the lab…Also the comparative display of heart sizes of small to big animals and birds.This was at the Benjamin Franklin Museum.

A demo of Virtual Reality at the Museum – had never seen one before, though read and heard a lot… companies like Google, Facebook freaking on it.

The 3D-printing demo, also at the Museum…unbelievable…printing such intricate parts!!! An interesting chat ensued with staff in attendance, a mechanical engineer, on the relative strengths of parts forged, machined and printed,

The last to respond was Sh (11 years old): The best for me was the time I could spend out here with you all…such fun!!

 

End

 

 

Source: images from visitphilly.com, yelp

 

A Child’s Play…

with colors:

Drawings by kids are always interesting for the splash of colors, the juxtaposed objects, their shapes…Here  are some, selected from a large collection:

Phoenix (by Sh, 11 yrs)

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A ‘The Sun And The Moon’ theme (by Ne, 8 yrs)

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A Deer In The Forest (by An, 8 yrs)

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Love Birds (by Ne) 

When asked, the ugly on the left is the boy and the pretty on the right is the girl, the artist clarified!

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Love Birds (by Sh)

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A Lion and Its Cub (by Ni)

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The cub is demanding attention and the father won’t be bothered, explained Ni.

A Stingray And A Coral (by Sh)

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A Stingray And Corals (by Ni)

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A Known Story And A Hither-To Unknown Moral Or A Super-Dad!

The mother read from a picture book a story for her 6-year old at bed time, along the way explaining words that were new. The story – quite familiar to us from days we were knee-high or even before – goes like this:

A farmer in the village had four sons who always quarreled over one thing or the other. All attempts by the man to bring them together were to no avail.

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The matter assumed greater urgency in view of the man’s failing health. He decided he would make one last try before leaving them to their fate.

He called them to his bed. When they had assembled he bade the eldest to bring some dry sticks and a piece of rope from the back of the house.

The sticks were tied together in a bundle. The eldest who was also the heaviest was asked by the farmer to break the bundle into two. He tried hard exerting himself to the limits, but he couldn’t.  His brothers too tried one by one and failed like he did. They gave the bundle back to the father, crest fallen.

Thereupon the farmer asked them to untie the bundle and gave them a stick each. This time they could break the sticks rather effortlessly, all of them.

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At this point the mother paused, as she always did in these story-telling sessions, put the book away to quiz the girl on parts of the story including questions like what-would-do-you-do-if-you-were, inevitably ending with what-is-the-moral-of-the-story.

The girl thought for a moment screwing up her eyes and then broke into a smile:

‘Mom, this is exactly what I do. If ever you’ve a difficult problem to solve, take it to your dad. He’ll find a way out.’

Just then dad walked in and seeing the mother holding her head in her hands, silent, searching for a response, inquired: ‘Why, what’s the problem?’

End

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PS: Based on a real experience at my daughter’s place.

Source: Images from kutties.in, kidsultimatezone.blogspot.com