Can You Spot It?

Something interesting here, I thought, though not the kind to set Ganges on fire.

This is a picture taken by B, an ex-colleague. a friend, a nature lover, an ace shooter…with his camera, a cook who loves to experiment, a reviewer of eateries, etc. etc.

Location: Chembur.

To me, it is interesting to see this winged fellow picking twigs for the nest, all of uniform girth, neither too thick and stiff or too thin and breakable as if there exists some engineering specification!

End

What Are Men, BF, Husbands Like!

**

**

A cyclone hit a Kansas farmhouse just before dawn one morning.

It tore off the roof, and picked up the beds on which the farmer and his wife slept were sleeping.  By some miracle, the cyclone set them down unharmed the next county over.

The wife was sobbing uncontrollably.  “Don’t be scared, Mary,” her husband said.  “We’re not hurt.”

Mary continued to cry.  “I’m not scared,” she said between sobs.  “I’m happy…  this is the first time in 14 years we’ve been out together.”

**

**

Wife leaves a note on the fridge: “I have made all attempts. It’s not working. 
I can’t take it anymore. I am going to stay at my Mom’s place!!  😡 😥

Husband opens the fridge, checks the beer bottle. Feels it is cold. He takes a few big gulps from the bottle. Feels it is chilled.

Then says to himself, “What the hell is she talking about??? Fridge is working fine!!”

**

**

End

Source: 100% சிரிப்பு இலவசம் , Santabanta.com, Quora, Usha Narayanan and rays-daily.com/

Did He Get It Right?

Real-life fiction:

**

Time and place: Morning at the temple.

It was goshti time after receiving theertham (sacred water) and sadari.

[Goshti is when at the end of morning rituals, prasadam, usually thayir sadam (curd rice) is distributed to the assembled on plates or small bowls (dhonnai’s) fashioned out of leaves stitched together]

Many sat down and some of us with stiff joints stood to one side.

One of the staff (kiankaryaparars) distributed the dhonnai’s to all in the assembly to receive prasadam (a small part of the food offered to the god is returned to the devotees with blessings).

The cook in his traditional attire followed him from the kitchen carrying on his hip an anda (a big brass vessel) containing thayir sadam. With practiced efficiency, starting at one end of the small arc, he took a handful of sadam, dropped it into the first dhonnai held out, quickly moving on to the next man and to the next…

When he came to G – I see him once in a while at the temple – standing next to me, I noticed him slowing down with a deference, not par for a goshti, and a hint of a smile on his face. And the recipient acknowledging it by gesture and nod.

As the cook moved on to where ladies were, I asked in hushed voice: ‘What gives?’

G whispered back: ‘Only yesterday…he wanted some monetary help for his daughter’s college fees studying back in the South. I gave him’

‘Oh,’ so that was it.

Distribution over, the goshti was dismissed.

As we did the customary pradakshinam (circumambulating the sanctum) together, completing the last round, G went up to ring the kitchen bell!

When the cook came out, he asked if there would be some extra thayir sadam available.

A little strange, it was. This man many a times walked away without waiting for the goshti and the prasadam. And when he did stand in, he would specially request for a small portion. And today, he took it in full in the goshti and now was asking for more!

What was the matter? Perhaps he’s taking it for some guests visiting him?

He saw my nonplussed look and made a gesture for me to hold.

The cook, a bit surprised likewise, appeared too happy to oblige him.

A short while later he returned with a neatly wrapped and tied parcel.

As he handed it over, I noticed – the cook appeared pleased with himself and his demeanor going back to the formal, what it was always, without the deference, even if only a wee bit, displayed visibly earlier in the goshti! Not that he was rude, at any time.

Something nagged me nevertheless. Was gratitude so evanescent?

As we exited the temple, G turned to me: ‘I see you noticed it. Upset?’

Wasn’t he upset? And, here he’s asking me if I were.

Didn’t feel up to responding.

‘You see, my friend, I certainly did a favour to him, he too did one to me, whatever was within his capacity. Now the ledger is balanced, his self-respect has re-asserted itself.’

Weird! Interesting! Is that how it works? No student of human psychology and behaviour, could not agree or differ with G’s insight and intelligence in this matter.

Now outside the temple we were ready to part.

‘Here, take this, I’ve no use for it. Am single,’ he thrust the parcel into my hands and took off leaving me standing.  

When he was a few steps gone, he turned to me: ‘Don’t lose your peace over it, my friend. That’s precisely why I asked for it!’

May be, before I meet him next, I will have sorted this out in my head.

End

Source. deskgram.net

A Matter Of Give And Take

A real-life fiction:

**

Dinner time.

Bhindi (okra), again?

No surprises there – the girl was asked to eat vegetables. A short sermon on importance of the greens for her health, as always, fell on un-listening ears. For, it is bhindi tonight, spinach yesterday…yuk, and not potatoes, yummy. These folks never seem to understand or ask – it wasn’t she didn’t like vegetables. It was just that cauliflower and cabbage smelled, bhindi sticky, beet-root scary scarlet, spinach sticking between her teeth, beans tasteless, peas squishy, carrot hard to bite…and heaven knows why potatoes didn’t count? By the way, aren’t there any green potatoes? Why, she liked cucumber too, in the raw.

Finally on the promise of a cup of her favorite ice-cream, the task was accomplished……like how – her eyes closed, face screwed into a grimace, the morsel put out on the tongue like vom## and then taken in, mostly swallowed…

All done and over with, they – the father and the girl – set off to the market, he had some chores to complete, she to claim her reward.  

At the shop, another scene was averted – fortunately the mango flavor was in stock. Gleefully consumed – some, dribbling from the corner of her mouth, onto the counter.

On their way back – the girl in good cheer – he paused at a street-side vendor’s and got two vada-paav’s with dry and wet chutney’s parceled.

The girl looked at her father quizzingly.

‘There’s a sight-impaired young man near the bus-shelter. Whenever I come this way, I usually get this or samosas for him.’

Her face did not clear completely.

The father knew enough to add: ‘On the days I don’t, may be the vendors give him or someone else like us buys him something to eat – I don’t think he starves.’

The girl became more at ease – if her father said the man did not starve, it must be so – and soon was distracted.

**

At the bus-shelter, there he was on the bench.

The hot vada-paav’s were given and accepted gratefully.

The girl looking on nervously keeping herself on father’s far side.

The deed done, the two quickened their steps homewards.

Nearer home, the girl broke her silence: ‘Appa, how do you know he likes vada-paav and samosa’s? Asked him?’

**

The following days saw new sources located for idli/vada and roti/sabji.

End

Source: Image from hungrydeal.com

Chuckles

Thanks to Usha Narayanan:

**

In Delhi, people don’t know Which Car to take out today.

In Dubai, people don’t know Which Wife to take out today.

In Vegas, they don’t know Whose Wife to take out today.

Different Countries, Different Problems!!😜

Best is…In Bangalore, People don’t know Which Road to take to reach office today..😄

**

During Annual Health Checkup in a Company, two employees were found to have normal blood pressure and normal blood sugar.

Both were terminated for not putting in their full efforts.

**

Husband:  Tomorrow is your birthday. What gift would you like ?

Wife: A giraffe!

Husband: Darling, please be reasonable. Where do I get a giraffe from? Ask for something that is possible.

Wife: Ok, then give up drinking. That you can do and I’ll accept it as a good gift.

So next day…… 👇

**

(caution: gross)

Boss : Muthuswamy, for 30 years you have been bringing me coffee, filled to the brim, without even spilling a drop. How do you manage that over these stairs?

Muthu: Sir, before I climb up the stairs I take a big sip. When I get upstairs, I put it back!

Yikes!

Muthu’s Farewell Party is tomorrow…….😁

**

Finally, watch this clip – don’t miss this one:

1. Duck from Germany
2. Cat from Korea
3. Saroja from India

If the clip does not appear above, watch it here.

**

End

PS: There are reports on the net saying the German clip is doctored.

More Tiny Tales (Drabbles)

drabble  (Wiki) is a short work of fiction of precisely one hundred words in length. The purpose of the drabble is brevity, testing the author’s ability to express interesting and meaningful ideas in a confined space.

**

Darkness

By G. Allen Willbanks from The Drabble:

“Why are you afraid of the dark? Darkness is the natural state of everything. It’s the light that’s unnatural. When God said, ‘Let there be light,’ he was imposing an artificial reality on a universe that had previously only know known total darkness and emptiness, and every force in nature is currently trying to drive us back to that original point of neutrality. Everything around us is temporary, and at some point in the future we will all return to that initial state of nothingness. It’s inevitable.”

“Maybe,” his wife admitted. “But, I still want you to replace the light-bulb.”

           
G. Allen Wilbanks is a member of the Horror Writers Association (HWA) and has published over 60 short stories in Deep Magic, Daily Science Fiction, The Talisman, and other venues. He has published two story collections, and the novel, When Darkness Comes.

**

Tucked In (98)


By Will Gilmer from The Drabble:

“Irrational fear is a luxury,” Youssef thought as workers at the refugee orphanage checked under beds and rummaged through the closets of the other children. Each received a smile and a thumbs up signaling that their area was free of ghouls and goblins.

Back home Youssef’s nightmares never had time for make-believe. The realities of famine and war didn’t leave room for Bogeymen.

“Any monsters hiding under your bed Youssef?”

Youssef shook his head and pointed to the window. The confused worker craned her head to the stars, never guessing that when Youssef dreamed, he dreamed of drones.

         
William Gilmer is a writer and poet living in Michigan where Fall never lasts long enough.

**

Going Home (70)

By Traci Mullins from The Drabble:

Dottie wheeled her small pink suitcase to the double doors and waited.

A smiling woman approached and asked where she was going.

“Home,” Dottie answered.

“I think you’re early for the bus,” the nice woman said. “I’ll show you where you can sit comfortably until it gets here.”

Dottie thanked her and followed her down the hallway, back to her room at Sunset Memory Care, as she did every morning.

“I once heard that a tiny story is like a work of art on a grain of rice. I’m enticed by the challenge to give readers a meaningful experience in a tiny package.” – the author.

**

A Woman’s Will

By S. H. Cheatham from 101 Words:

“No!” She tossed her blonde hair and marched angrily away, the clop clopof heels on wood telegraphing her fury.

You’d think I’d asked her to torture puppies or renounce chocolate forever, when I had simply suggested—very kindly—that she change into something slightly less revealing for dinner with my boss and her husband. And perhaps remove a bit of the lipstick and eye shadow she must have applied with a spackling trowel.

“Honey,” I said, tapping tentatively. The response was a thunk as an unknown object (shoe? hairbrush?) struck the bedroom door.

Such is life when mothering a three-year-old!

**

End