The Oak And The Rose

Oak

An oak tree and a rosebush grew,
Young and green together,
Talking the talk of growing things-
Wind and water and weather.
And while the rosebush sweetly bloomed
The oak tree grew so high
That now it spoke of newer things-
Eagles, mountain peaks and sky.
‘I guess you think you’re pretty great,’
The rose was heard to cry,
Screaming as loud as it possibly could
To the treetop in the sky.
‘And now you have no time for flower talk,
Now that you’ve grown so tall.’
‘It’s not so much that I’ve grown,’ said the tree,
‘It’s just that you’ve stayed so small.’

Sheldon Allan Silverstein

Shel Silverstein is widely known for his children’s books and poetry. He had a fresh, new style that broke the mold of children’s literature. His work was able to connect with an audience of children through the use of simple, made up languages and silly scenariosSilverstein’s work didn’t only have an influence on children. It was able to be related to by all people. His simple, understandable poems and books are fun to read, but hold deeper and diverse meanings to different people (Ung). Silverstein was able to reach to all people, despite age and gender by writing about common experiences everyone has, and by using versatility to connect with different audiences (Ung, Meyer)

A couple of earlier posts on his poems here: https://ksriranga.wordpress.com/2011/09/04/the-little-boy-and-the-old-man-%e2%80%93-poems-of-shel-silverstein/ and the following.

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Credits: poemhunter.com/poem/.and wiki. The image is of a painting ‘Bluebonnets Under The Oak’ of David G Paul, an artist painting landscapes, figurative, and some still life in oils (fineartamerica.com/profiles/1-david-paul.html).

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3 Responses to The Oak And The Rose

  1. What a wonderful story. I hope my friends never grow so tall.
    http://www.awordofsubstance.wordpress.com

    Like

  2. Sharmishtha says:

    that is a very interesting way of looking at their relation!

    Like

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