Monday Masti

A Tiger Weds

One day tiger gave his wedding party to his friends.

He saw a mouse dancing. He asked ‘How dare you come here? Aren’t you afraid?’

Mouse laughed and said “Even I was a tiger before marriage”

Witness To A Miracle

The sister working for a home health agency was out making her rounds visiting home-bound patients when she ran out of gas. As luck would have it, a gas station was just a block away.

She walked to the station to borrow a gas can and buy some gas. The attendant told her that the only gas can he owned had been loaned out, but she could wait until it was returned. Since she was on the way to see a patient, she decided not to wait and walked back to her car to look for something in her car that she could fill with gas.

She spotted the bedpan she was taking to the patient. Always resourceful, the sister carried the bedpan to the station, filled it with gasoline, and carried the full bedpan back to her car.

As she was pouring the gas into her tank, two drunks watched from across the street. One of them turned to the other and said,

“If it starts, I’m joining the Church!!”

A note by the editor in his newspaper

“Don’t be surprised if you find mistakes in this editorial newsletter. We print something for everyone. And some people are always looking for mistakes.”

Wrong And Right

There are worse things than getting a call for a wrong number at 4 a.m. – like, it could be the right number.

Soul Food

Money will buy a fine dog, but only kindness will make him wag his tail.

From Eric Hoffer:

In times of change, learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists.

Our great weariness comes from work not done.

It is a sign of a creeping inner death when we no longer can praise the living.

Rudeness is the weak man’s imitation of strength.

The beginning of thought is in disagreement—not only with others but also with ourselves.


The world leans on us. When we sag, the whole world seems to droop.

We are more prone to generalize the bad than the good. We assume that the bad is more potent and contagious.

When we believe ourselves in possession of the only truth, we are likely to be indifferent to common everyday truths.

We all have private ails. The troublemakers are they who need public cures for their private ails.

The suspicious mind believes more than it doubts. It believes in a formidable and ineradicable evil lurking in every person.

Eric Hoffer (1902-1983) is nobody’s ideal of a public intellectual. He had no real schooling. He spent most of his working life as a longshoreman on the San Francisco docks. Almost every day, he took a three-mile walk. Along the way, thoughts formed. Later they became sentences, then books. Over the years, he wrote ten. “The True Believer” is his masterpiece. The genius of this book is Hoffer’s ability to see beyond individual behavior to patterns of thought and behavior.

When he was age five, his mother fell down a flight of stairs with Eric in her arms. Hoffer went blind for unknown medical reasons two years later, at the age of seven. His mother did not recover and died in that second year after the fall. After his mother’s death he was raised by a live-in relative or servant, a German woman. His eyesight inexplicably returned when he was 15. Fearing he would again go blind, he seized upon the opportunity to read as much as he could for as long as he could. His eyesight remained, and Hoffer never abandoned his habit of voracious reading.

End

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Sources: Grateful thanks to funfunky.com, Steve (Fellowship Of The Minds), headbutler.com, poemhunter.com, openclipart.org (PeterM, Gerald_G, DooFi, pitr, johnny), amazing-animations.com and Wiki

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2 Responses to Monday Masti

  1. Sharmishtha says:

    Reblogged this on Thoughts.

    Like

  2. Sharmishtha says:

    amazing collection. 🙂
    loved the quote about dog, its very true.

    Like

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